Wake Up 1994

Short film from animator Tsuji Naoyuki, who is known for his use of both charcoal and puppet animation. Wake Up is a dark and brooding animation epitomizing his story telling style by combining serene worlds and childlike images with darkness and nightmarish scenes.

Mayan 1974

This tape combines live-images filmed in the Yucatan with output from the Paik video-synthesizer ribboned with computer-generated images.

The Froggy Froggy Duo 1970

While Pancho and El Toro are vacationing in Acapulco, a nearby hotel cook is desperate to find some frog legs to cook for the visiting French ambassador. But where is he going to find frog legs in Acapulco?

The Magic Tree 1970

When the neglected and unloved brother Mavungu finally leaves home, he finds a tree blocking the river and frees the people imprisoned within the tree. Based on a folk tale from the Congo.

Affinities 1972

A ballet of squares and octagons in many forms, exhibiting a variety of geometric and sometimes sensuous interactions.

Area 88 Act III: Burning Mirage 1986

Shin Kazama, tricked and forced into flying for the remote country of Aslan, can only escape the hell of war by earning money for shooting down enemy planes or die trying. Through the course of the series, Shin must deal with the consequences of killing and friends dying around him as tries to keep his mind on freeing himself from this nightmare.

The Stuntman

From cowboys to cannons, diving to racing, perhaps nothing can stop this stuntman

Frannie's Christmas

As Christmas approaches, Frannie Stein learns from her snide friend Gloria Oestriger that there is no Santa Claus. Frannie's disbelieving, but her father confirms the horrible truth. Frannie enlists the help of her younger brother, Kenny, and they go to a graveyard to dig up some parts, which they assemble in the Stein basement. Soon, they've finished their creation and are ready for revenge on Gloria. Who says there's no Santa?

Ko-Ko 1988

Using a 1945 Charlie Parker song, American indie animator, George Griffin greets us with a dizzying dance of torn Pop Art images. Shreds of consumer culture flash before us, swayed and absorbed by the tempo and power of Parker's horn.